Difference between revisions of "Main Page"

From WirelessAfrica
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Line 1: Line 1:
 
__NOTOC__
 
__NOTOC__
 
  
  
Line 11: Line 10:
 
[[Image: Sa-mesh-node2.JPG|thumb]]
 
[[Image: Sa-mesh-node2.JPG|thumb]]
  
Their are a plethora of mesh routing protocols being used worldwide today (See: [[Wireless Mesh Networking]]). Some of these have become popular due to organizations taking the trouble to convert the specification into usable code that can be run on a wireless router while other protocols remain purely academic and have only been run on computer simulations. There is also a new 802.11s working group which is seeking to create [[Mesh Standards]]. Protocols for which code is available will be run on the massive mesh, indoor testbed, which consists of a grid of 49 nodes (See 1st thumbnail image). Some code will also be ported to run on the massive mesh - for example HSLS is being ported to FreeBSD and Linux. Performance metrics will be gathered such as average throughput and latency together with their variance.
+
The first prototype of a multi antenna self-contained mesh node was unveiled in December 2006. This nodes operates on a 45W solar panel to power the embedded computer and three 802.11 radios. The backhaul mesh is built in the 5GHz band using 2 radios which can be switched through a matrix of 4 antennas. This allows a full duplex connection on the backhaul. The Switachable antenna matrix consists of 4 5GHz panel antennas placed at 90 degrees to each other within a weather proof cylinder. An intelligent switching algorithm is used to switch through the four antennas and locate the other mesh nodes in the network. Switching happens as soon as traffic needs to be routed between mesh nodes. A 2.4GHz band radio connected to an omni is used to connect clients to the mesh node.
  
  
== 1 October 2005 Tin can connects rural home to outside world ==
+
== 1 October 2006 Tin can connects rural home to outside world ==
  
 
[[Image: Cantenna-peebles-small.jpg|thumb]]
 
[[Image: Cantenna-peebles-small.jpg|thumb]]
 +
 +
  
  

Revision as of 10:48, 20 February 2007


Tobar.jpg

The Wireless Africa group is researching ways and means to develop sustainable information and communications technology in developing countries. This will be achieved through community-owned decentralized mesh networks built on open source technology.

10 December 2006 Prototype 1 of fully self-contained solar powered SA mesh node

Sa-mesh-node2.JPG

The first prototype of a multi antenna self-contained mesh node was unveiled in December 2006. This nodes operates on a 45W solar panel to power the embedded computer and three 802.11 radios. The backhaul mesh is built in the 5GHz band using 2 radios which can be switched through a matrix of 4 antennas. This allows a full duplex connection on the backhaul. The Switachable antenna matrix consists of 4 5GHz panel antennas placed at 90 degrees to each other within a weather proof cylinder. An intelligent switching algorithm is used to switch through the four antennas and locate the other mesh nodes in the network. Switching happens as soon as traffic needs to be routed between mesh nodes. A 2.4GHz band radio connected to an omni is used to connect clients to the mesh node.


1 October 2006 Tin can connects rural home to outside world

Cantenna-peebles-small.jpg





NEW: Quick getting started guide for setting up an outdoor mesh node


Please use the discussion tag above to comment and provide suggestions! Please Email wa-admin(at)meraka.org.za if you wish to contribute or for further information.

Meraka.jpg